5. Origami: In Art and Science – Lei Bammel

$10.00

Description

4 weeks – Wednesdays, 10:00-12:00, February 10-March 3, 2021.

Have you always been fascinated with Origami and/or wanted to be able to fold little Cranes out of colorful squares of paper? Or would you like to learn a new activity to promote brain plasticity?  Origami is a wonderful brain training activity and this course is tailor made for you. But it will go much beyond just teaching some traditional Japanese folds and the standard International symbols. It will consist of three sections: (1) Learning some simple folds to get you started, (2) A little history of Origami (the types of origami and the different papers used) and (3) Viewing a few DVDs (on your own, when you want) documenting artists, scientists and how the knowledge of folding is being applied in science and medicine to design drugs, equipment, and to assist in future space missions.  These DVDs will be discussed. The first class will start with folding a simple triangular bookmark and hopefully by the end of the course you will complete the traditional crane. Along the way there will be useful items like note cards and decorations. You may never look at paper the same way again. This course was given last year, slightly differently, when the circumstances were different. For those in or near SCOV a book, Easy Origami by John Montrol, and some 6” or 15cm square paper will be available for pick up. Those not local will have to purchase, or check out from a library, the book ($4.95 at Amazon) and purchase some 6” single-sided solid color squares (taro’s origami studio standard at Amazon $9.90 for 200 sheets, enough for two participants. Standard means solid color on one side and white on the other.)

Lei Bammel has been doing Origami off and on for a few years with perhaps her most interesting “model” being 4 Cranes attached at their beaks (Senbazuru) from just one 8.25” piece of paper. She has made Origami note cards, fancy envelopes, hanging hummingbirds, jewelry, Christmas ornaments, name place holders, folded dollar bills to be left as tips or gifts, Crane earrings from foil tea bag packets, and much more. Possibilities are endless! Her pre-retirement years were primarily allocated to University teaching, research, writing (articles and books), conference presentations and community service. She has always participated in some form of craft, including stained and fused glass, wheel thrown pottery, paper cutting (Scherenschnitte), portrait drawing, water colors, jewelry making, and sewing.